Dec
28
Sat
Marionette Show – “The Frog Prince” with Carl Sprague
Dec 28 @ 3:30 pm

Dec. 30 rescheduled to Sat., Jan. 4 at 3:30 pm.

The popular puppeteer Carl Sprague will return to Ventfort Hall Mansion and Gilded Age Museum in Lenox to charm all ages with the classic fairytale “The Frog Prince” for two Christmas-week marionette performances.  The dates and times are Saturday, December 28th and Monday, December 30th both at 3:30 pm. The audiences will have the opportunity to meet this wizard, who knows how to pull strings. Children’s refreshments will be served.

One of the themes of “The Frog Prince is about keeping your promises. The princess tries to back out of her promise to the frog, but her father insists that she maintain her integrity. As a result, the princess ends up with her prince. Another theme is about persistence.

Sprague, who has appeared annually at Ventfort Hall with his “behind the scenery” mastery, has been a puppeteer since childhood.  He inherited a collection of 60 antique Czech marionettes, each about eight inches tall that were assembled by his great-grandfather, Julius Hybler, with purchased heads and hand-made costumes.  Hybler’s legacy also includes two marionette theaters.

Also, Sprague has been a set designer for such motion pictures as “The Royal Tenenbaums” and Scorcese’s “The Age of Innocence,” as well as for theater productions including those of Shakespeare & Company.

Admission to the show is $15 per person; $7 for children 4-17 and free for 3 and under. Children must be accompanied by adults.  Reservations are strongly recommended as seating is limited. Please call us at 413-637-3206 for reservations.

Dec
30
Mon
CLOSED TODAY DUE TO WEATHER
Dec 30 all-day
Dec
31
Tue
CLOSED TODAY DUE TO WEATHER
Dec 31 2019 – Jan 1 2020 all-day

CLOSED TOD

Jan
1
Wed
CLOSED NEW YEAR’S DAY
Jan 1 all-day
Jan
4
Sat
Marionette Show – “The Frog Prince” with Carl Sprague
Jan 4 @ 3:30 pm

Dec. 30 rescheduled to Sat., Jan. 4 at 3:30 pm.

The popular puppeteer Carl Sprague will return to Ventfort Hall Mansion and Gilded Age Museum in Lenox to charm all ages with the classic fairytale “The Frog Prince” for two Christmas-week marionette performances.  The dates and times are Saturday, December 28th and Monday, December 30th both at 3:30 pm. The audiences will have the opportunity to meet this wizard, who knows how to pull strings. Children’s refreshments will be served.

One of the themes of “The Frog Prince is about keeping your promises. The princess tries to back out of her promise to the frog, but her father insists that she maintain her integrity. As a result, the princess ends up with her prince. Another theme is about persistence.

Sprague, who has appeared annually at Ventfort Hall with his “behind the scenery” mastery, has been a puppeteer since childhood.  He inherited a collection of 60 antique Czech marionettes, each about eight inches tall that were assembled by his great-grandfather, Julius Hybler, with purchased heads and hand-made costumes.  Hybler’s legacy also includes two marionette theaters.

Also, Sprague has been a set designer for such motion pictures as “The Royal Tenenbaums” and Scorcese’s “The Age of Innocence,” as well as for theater productions including those of Shakespeare & Company.

Admission to the show is $15 per person; $7 for children 4-17 and free for 3 and under. Children must be accompanied by adults.  Reservations are strongly recommended as seating is limited. Please call us at 413-637-3206 for reservations.

Jan
8
Wed
Day Trip to NYC for an Exclusive Viewing of “John Singer Sargent: Portraits in Charcoal” at the Morgan Library & Museum
Jan 8 all-day

John Singer Sargent. (l. to r.) Sybil Sassoon, Henry James, Jennie Jerome, Ethel Barrymore

“IT’S LIKE GOING TO A PARTY AND WORKING THE ROOM.”

                             Overheard at the Morgan Library & Museum

 This is a rare opportunity to view with our own specialist fifty-three charcoal portraits by John Singer Sargent (1856-1925), America’s greatest portrait painter of his time.  These drawn works of art represent a substantial, yet often overlooked, part of his practice – they number over 750 in total – and demonstrate the same sense of immediacy, psychological insight and mastery of light and shade that animate Sargent’s sitters on canvas. This is the first major exhibition to explore these expressive portraits in charcoal.

The exhibition includes important international loans from both public and private collections, showcasing Sargent’s sitters, many of them famous for their roles in politics, society and the arts.  They represent telling records of artistic and cultural friendships, as well as the network of patronage that underpinned Sargent’s practice as a portrait artist.

Ventfort Hall has made arrangements for the trip via private motor coach leaving from the mansion, 104 Walker St. in Lenox, at 9:00 am and arriving back at 7:00 pm.  All-day parking at Ventfort Hall is arranged. The cost of the trip is $165 and includes motor coach transportation and a $50 fully tax-deductible donation to Ventfort Hall Mansion and Gilded Age Museum.  Lunch will be selected individually from the Library’s restaurant menu as will payment. Call us at (413) 637-3206 to reserve your spot today as seating is limited.

Jan
23
Thu
Women in Film Seminar – “Invisible: Female Fim Makers Before 1960”
Jan 23 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Berkshire screenwriter and historian Nannina Gilder, as well as former film curator for the Little Cinema at The Berkshire Museum, will host a four-part Women in Film Seminar titled “Invisible: Female Filmmakers Before 1960” here at the mansion. The classes are scheduled for Thursdays, January 23 and 30, February 6 and 13, all at 7:00 – 9:00 pm. Ventfort Hall board member Birgit Vetromile is the sponsor for the film series.

Gilder asks these questions, “Imagine telling the history of film without the first director to use the camera to tell a story, or the first feature length animated movie?”  “Who was the first surrealist filmmaker, or the director of the first movie of the French New Wave?”

“For decades these milestones have actually been relegated to a dusty corner of film history,” according to Gilder, “pushed aside in favor of a straightforward narrative of brilliant men behind the camera and beautiful women in front of it. Films directed by women in the early decades of cinematography have been considered obscure curiosities, but the truth is much richer and more complex.”

Gilder will delve into how actress Ida Lupino became a writer/director/producer who changed the face of American independent film, how Dorothy Arzner’s technical innovations in the early sound era untethered actors, giving them the freedom to move and express themselves, how Lotte Reiniger’s magic scissors and multi-plane camera opened up worlds of animation or how Alice Guy came to make of the first non-documentary film.

Female directors included in the seminar were nominated for Oscars and won awards at Cannes and Venice. Their films influenced such directors as Alfred Hitchcock, Martin Scoresse and Francis Ford Coppola.

The seminar will offer a glimpse into movies that changed the face of cinema, but today are hard to find.  Each of the four classes will examine short and feature-length films in the context of these themes: January 23, The Birth of Cinema – Alice Guy (short) and Ida Lupino (feature); January 30, Dancer & Director – Shirley Clarke (short) and Dorothy Arzner (feature); February 6, Worlds of Animation – TBA (short) and Lotte Reiniger (feature), and February 13, Obsession – Wendy Toye (short) and Jacqueline Audry (feature).

Gilder comments, “The seminar will reveal that not only were women making films in the classical period of cinema, but they were crafting beautiful, vibrant pieces of entertainment. The history of film is inseparable from the history of women in film.”

Gilder has appeared on the film podcast Citizen Dame. Her play “The Curious Abduction of Mona Lisa” was performed at Ventfort Hall in 2013.

Tickets for the Women in Film seminar are $15 for each of the four classes or $50 for the four-part series.  Reservations are highly recommended as seating is limited.  For reservations call us at 413-637-3206.

Jan
30
Thu
Women in Film Seminar – “Invisible: Female Fim Makers Before 1960”
Jan 30 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Berkshire screenwriter and historian Nannina Gilder, as well as former film curator for the Little Cinema at The Berkshire Museum, will host a four-part Women in Film Seminar titled “Invisible: Female Filmmakers Before 1960” here at the mansion. The classes are scheduled for Thursdays, January 23 and 30, February 6 and 13, all at 7:00 – 9:00 pm. Ventfort Hall board member Birgit Vetromile is the sponsor for the film series.

Gilder asks these questions, “Imagine telling the history of film without the first director to use the camera to tell a story, or the first feature length animated movie?”  “Who was the first surrealist filmmaker, or the director of the first movie of the French New Wave?”

“For decades these milestones have actually been relegated to a dusty corner of film history,” according to Gilder, “pushed aside in favor of a straightforward narrative of brilliant men behind the camera and beautiful women in front of it. Films directed by women in the early decades of cinematography have been considered obscure curiosities, but the truth is much richer and more complex.”

Gilder will delve into how actress Ida Lupino became a writer/director/producer who changed the face of American independent film, how Dorothy Arzner’s technical innovations in the early sound era untethered actors, giving them the freedom to move and express themselves, how Lotte Reiniger’s magic scissors and multi-plane camera opened up worlds of animation or how Alice Guy came to make of the first non-documentary film.

Female directors included in the seminar were nominated for Oscars and won awards at Cannes and Venice. Their films influenced such directors as Alfred Hitchcock, Martin Scoresse and Francis Ford Coppola.

The seminar will offer a glimpse into movies that changed the face of cinema, but today are hard to find.  Each of the four classes will examine short and feature-length films in the context of these themes: January 23, The Birth of Cinema – Alice Guy (short) and Ida Lupino (feature); January 30, Dancer & Director – Shirley Clarke (short) and Dorothy Arzner (feature); February 6, Worlds of Animation – TBA (short) and Lotte Reiniger (feature), and February 13, Obsession – Wendy Toye (short) and Jacqueline Audry (feature).

Gilder comments, “The seminar will reveal that not only were women making films in the classical period of cinema, but they were crafting beautiful, vibrant pieces of entertainment. The history of film is inseparable from the history of women in film.”

Gilder has appeared on the film podcast Citizen Dame. Her play “The Curious Abduction of Mona Lisa” was performed at Ventfort Hall in 2013.

Tickets for the Women in Film seminar are $15 for each of the four classes or $50 for the four-part series.  Reservations are highly recommended as seating is limited.  For reservations call us at 413-637-3206.

Feb
6
Thu
Women in Film Seminar – “Invisible: Female Fim Makers Before 1960”
Feb 6 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Berkshire screenwriter and historian Nannina Gilder, as well as former film curator for the Little Cinema at The Berkshire Museum, will host a four-part Women in Film Seminar titled “Invisible: Female Filmmakers Before 1960” here at the mansion. The classes are scheduled for Thursdays, January 23 and 30, February 6 and 13, all at 7:00 – 9:00 pm. Ventfort Hall board member Birgit Vetromile is the sponsor for the film series.

Gilder asks these questions, “Imagine telling the history of film without the first director to use the camera to tell a story, or the first feature length animated movie?”  “Who was the first surrealist filmmaker, or the director of the first movie of the French New Wave?”

“For decades these milestones have actually been relegated to a dusty corner of film history,” according to Gilder, “pushed aside in favor of a straightforward narrative of brilliant men behind the camera and beautiful women in front of it. Films directed by women in the early decades of cinematography have been considered obscure curiosities, but the truth is much richer and more complex.”

Gilder will delve into how actress Ida Lupino became a writer/director/producer who changed the face of American independent film, how Dorothy Arzner’s technical innovations in the early sound era untethered actors, giving them the freedom to move and express themselves, how Lotte Reiniger’s magic scissors and multi-plane camera opened up worlds of animation or how Alice Guy came to make of the first non-documentary film.

Female directors included in the seminar were nominated for Oscars and won awards at Cannes and Venice. Their films influenced such directors as Alfred Hitchcock, Martin Scoresse and Francis Ford Coppola.

The seminar will offer a glimpse into movies that changed the face of cinema, but today are hard to find.  Each of the four classes will examine short and feature-length films in the context of these themes: January 23, The Birth of Cinema – Alice Guy (short) and Ida Lupino (feature); January 30, Dancer & Director – Shirley Clarke (short) and Dorothy Arzner (feature); February 6, Worlds of Animation – TBA (short) and Lotte Reiniger (feature), and February 13, Obsession – Wendy Toye (short) and Jacqueline Audry (feature).

Gilder comments, “The seminar will reveal that not only were women making films in the classical period of cinema, but they were crafting beautiful, vibrant pieces of entertainment. The history of film is inseparable from the history of women in film.”

Gilder has appeared on the film podcast Citizen Dame. Her play “The Curious Abduction of Mona Lisa” was performed at Ventfort Hall in 2013.

Tickets for the Women in Film seminar are $15 for each of the four classes or $50 for the four-part series.  Reservations are highly recommended as seating is limited.  For reservations call us at 413-637-3206.

Feb
13
Thu
Women in Film Seminar – “Invisible: Female Fim Makers Before 1960”
Feb 13 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Berkshire screenwriter and historian Nannina Gilder, as well as former film curator for the Little Cinema at The Berkshire Museum, will host a four-part Women in Film Seminar titled “Invisible: Female Filmmakers Before 1960” here at the mansion. The classes are scheduled for Thursdays, January 23 and 30, February 6 and 13, all at 7:00 – 9:00 pm. Ventfort Hall board member Birgit Vetromile is the sponsor for the film series.

Gilder asks these questions, “Imagine telling the history of film without the first director to use the camera to tell a story, or the first feature length animated movie?”  “Who was the first surrealist filmmaker, or the director of the first movie of the French New Wave?”

“For decades these milestones have actually been relegated to a dusty corner of film history,” according to Gilder, “pushed aside in favor of a straightforward narrative of brilliant men behind the camera and beautiful women in front of it. Films directed by women in the early decades of cinematography have been considered obscure curiosities, but the truth is much richer and more complex.”

Gilder will delve into how actress Ida Lupino became a writer/director/producer who changed the face of American independent film, how Dorothy Arzner’s technical innovations in the early sound era untethered actors, giving them the freedom to move and express themselves, how Lotte Reiniger’s magic scissors and multi-plane camera opened up worlds of animation or how Alice Guy came to make of the first non-documentary film.

Female directors included in the seminar were nominated for Oscars and won awards at Cannes and Venice. Their films influenced such directors as Alfred Hitchcock, Martin Scoresse and Francis Ford Coppola.

The seminar will offer a glimpse into movies that changed the face of cinema, but today are hard to find.  Each of the four classes will examine short and feature-length films in the context of these themes: January 23, The Birth of Cinema – Alice Guy (short) and Ida Lupino (feature); January 30, Dancer & Director – Shirley Clarke (short) and Dorothy Arzner (feature); February 6, Worlds of Animation – TBA (short) and Lotte Reiniger (feature), and February 13, Obsession – Wendy Toye (short) and Jacqueline Audry (feature).

Gilder comments, “The seminar will reveal that not only were women making films in the classical period of cinema, but they were crafting beautiful, vibrant pieces of entertainment. The history of film is inseparable from the history of women in film.”

Gilder has appeared on the film podcast Citizen Dame. Her play “The Curious Abduction of Mona Lisa” was performed at Ventfort Hall in 2013.

Tickets for the Women in Film seminar are $15 for each of the four classes or $50 for the four-part series.  Reservations are highly recommended as seating is limited.  For reservations call us at 413-637-3206.